Click Here to see what neutrinos look like in NOvA,
or scroll down to see live data streaming from both Far and Near NOvA detectors.

The Far Detector at Ash River

NOvA FD Live Event Image
The event display from the NOvA Far Detector. This image is live data (refreshes every 15 seconds, unless the detector's not taking data for some reason). The top large rectangle is the view from above, the bottom the view from the side: here's an example of how this maps onto a 3D detector. The NuMI beam from Fermilab is coming in from the right of the picture. Each pixel in these views is one long (15.6m), thin (4x6cm) PVC cell filled with mineral oil. A "lit" pixel is one where a charged particle crossed that cell, making a flash of light, color-coded by time (the lower-left "t($\mu$s)" graph). This "time" graph shows how many such hits happened at which time: overall, this is usually a 500 microsecond window of time. Most of the particles at the Far Detector are cosmic ray muons, which come zipping in from above and cross the detector in long straight lines. In 500 microseconds we expect around 40 such muons, all in the same picture (the colorful ones where the time axis is full). Neutrinos hitting the detector and making something we can see are far more rare, only a few per week!

The Near Detector at Fermilab

NOvA ND Live Event Image
The event display from the NOvA Near Detector. This image is live data (refreshes every 15 seconds, unless the detector is not taking data or the beam is off). The top large rectangle is the view from above, the bottom the view from the side. The NuMI beam from Fermilab is coming in from the right of the picture and other particles cross the detector in different directions. Each pixel in these views is one PVC cell filled with mineral oil. A "lit" pixel is one where a charged particle crossed that cell, making a flash of light, color-coded by "q(ADC)" or "charge": if a particle dumps more energy, it makes more light and thus more charge on our photosensors. The lower-left "t($\mu$s)" graph shows how many such hits happened at which time: this is usually a window of time 50 microseconds long at set intervals or 500 microseconds long around when the NuMI beam fired. The ND is 100m underground, greatly reducing the number of downgoing cosmic rays, and it is close to the beam source, so the neutrino intensity is much higher than at the FD. The Near Detector, being so close to the beam, has multiple neutrino interactions per beam spill: you can see the resulting particles spraying from right to left. When the neutrino beam is off the few cosmic rays which make it underground will be visible on this display.

Video Links

A time-lapse video of the detector construction
Building the first block of the detector
Exploring Neutrino Mysteries
NOvA: Building a Next Generation Neutrino Experiment
Detecting Neutrinos with the NOvA Detector
A longer "Neutrinos and the NOvA Detector" documentary, in four parts: 1,2,3,4.

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For comments and questions on this page specifically, email the page maintainer. For general discussion with the collaboration as a whole, try the social media links above!

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